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CATALOGUE 



OF 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY 



CHESTER COUNTY, 



PENNSYLVANIA, l, °^y „ 

FOR THE "d/ft, 

_A.O^.nDEiyCIOA.Ili "YTZE^IR,, 1893-94. 



$*£EEEE 



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PHILADELPHIA: 
THE JAS. B. RODGERS PRINTING COMPANY, 

52 and 54 North Sixth Street. 

1894. 



THIRTY-EIGHTH ACADEMICAL YEAR. 



THEOLOGICAL COMMENCEMENT, Tuesday, April 17, 1894. 

COLLEGIATE COMMENCEMENT, Tuesday, June 5, 1894. 



•<O-s$e-0« — 



THIRTY-NINTH ACADEMICAL YEAR. 



OPENING COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT, September 20, 1894. 

OPENING THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT, .... September 20, 1894. 

CLOSE OF FIRST SESSION, December 20, 1894. 

OPENING OF SECOND SESSION, January 3, 1895. 



(UruAfeeA of "taincofn Llni^er^ify. 

REV. WILLIAM R. BINGHAM, D. D., Oxford, Pa. 

HON. JAMES A. BEAVER, Bellefonte, Pa. 

HON. JOSEPH ALLISON, LL. D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

REV. WILLIAM A. HOLLIDAY, D. D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

REV. CHARLES A. DICKEY, D. D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

REV. STEPHEN W. DANA, D. D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

REV. GEORGE S. MOTT, D. D., Flemington, N. J. 

GEORGE E. DODGE, Esq., New York City, N. Y. 

REV. JOHN M. GALBREATH, A. M., Chestnut Level, Pa. 

JOHN M. C. DICKEY, Esq., Oxford, Pa. 

REV. NATHAN G. PARKE, D. D Pittston, Pa. 

REV. HENRY E. NILES, D. D., York, Pa. 

REV. THOMAS McCAULEY, D. D., Chester, Pa. 

REV. ISAAC N. RENDALL, D. D., Lincoln University, Pa. 

REV. GEORGE T. PURVES, D. D., Princeton, N. J., 

REV. HENRY H. WELLES, Kingston, Pa. 

REV. MELANCTHON W. JACOBUS, Hartford, Conn. 

WALTER CARTER, Esq., New York, N. Y. 

REV. ROBERT F. SAMPLE, D. D., New York, N. Y. 



©fficerA of tfte 5^oarc| 



PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD, 

Rev. WILLIAM R. BINGHAM, D. D., Oxford, Pa. 

TREASURER OF THE BOARD, 

J. EVERTON RAMSEY, Esq., Oxford, Pa. 

SECRETARY OF THE BOARD, 

Rev. JOHN M. GALBREATH, Chestnut Level, Pa. 



FINANCIAL SECRETARIES LINCOLN UNIVERSITY, 

Rev. EDWARD WEBB, Oxford, Pa. 
Rev. WILLIAM P. WHITE, D. D., Germantown, Pa. 



(SommifteeA 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

REV. WILLIAM R. BINGHAM, D. D., Oxford, Pa. 

REV. ISAAC N. KENDALL, D. D., Lincoln University, P< 

REV. THOMAS McCAULEY, D. D., Chester, Pa. 

JOHN M. C. DICKEY, Esq., Oxford, Pa. 

REV. JOHN M. GALBREATH, Chestnut Level, Pa. 



COMMITTEE ON COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 

REV. THOMAS McCAULEY, D. D., Chester, Pa. 

REV. NATHAN G. PARKE, D. D., Pittston, Pa. 

REV. GEORGE S. MOTT, D. D., Flemington, N. J. 

REV. WM. H. HOLLIDAY, D. D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



COMMITTEE ON THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

REV. STEPHEN W. DANA, D. D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

REV. HENRY E. NILES, D. D., York, Pa. 

REV. GEO. T. PURVES, D. D., Princeton N. J. 

REV. JOHN M. GALBREATH, Chestnut Level, Pa. 



INVESTING COMMITTEE. 

REV. WILLIAM R. BINGHAM, D. D., Oxford, Pa. 

REV. ISAAC N. RENDALL, D. D., Lincoln University, Pa. 

WALTER CARTER, Esq., New York. 



d>j?|?ieer$ oj? <#nAfruefiori aT^b ^o^eramenf. 



Rev. ISAAC N. RENDALL, D. D., 

Mary Warder Dickey President of Lincoln University. 

Rev. GILBERT T. WOODHULL, D. D., 

Charles Avery Professor of Classical and Hellenistic Greek and New Testament Literature. 

Rev. JOHN B. RENDALL, A. M., 

John H. Cassidy Professor of Latin and Principal of the Preparatory Department. 

Rev. SAMUEL A. MARTIN, D. D., 

Wm. E. Dodge Professor of Rhetoric, and Librarian. 

J. CRAIG MILLER, M. D., 

Wm. A. Holliday Professor of Natural Science. 

Rev. ROBERT L. STEWART, A. M., 

Professor of Pastoral Theology, Evidences of Christianity and Biblical Antiquities. 

Rev. J. ASPINWALL HODGE, D. D., 

Mrs. David Brown Professor of Instruction in the English Version of the Bible. 

WALTER L. WRIGHT, Jr., A. B., 

Reuben J. Flick Professor of Mathematics. 

Rev. WILLIAM DEAS KERSWILL, A. M., 

Henry A. Kerr Professor of Hebrew and History. 

Rev. WILLIAM R. BINGHAM, D. D., 

John C. Baldwin Instructor in Theology. 

JAMES R. BARRETT, A. M., 

Instructor in Rhetoric. 

CHARLES E. TUCKER, A. B., 

Instructor in Greek. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



ADMISSION AND ATTENDANCE. 

Every applicant for admission nmst present evidence of good moral 
character ; and if from any other institution, a certificate of honorable 
dismission from the proper authorities. 

After passing satisfactory examinations in the studies required for 
admission to the Freshman or any superior class, the candidate for 
admission shall matriculate, by subscribing to the laws of the Univer- 
sity, and by the payment of a matriculation fee of three dollars. 

All students in the University are required to attend daily prayers, 
religious services on the Lord's day, and such exercises of instruction 
and recitation as may be assigned to them. 

Students regularly advanced with their classes in the courses of 
study are required to return promptly to the University at the opening 
of the session. 

AID AND SELF-SUPPORT. 

Lincoln University was founded to bring the benefits of a liberal 
Christian education within the reach of worthy colored youth of the 
male sex. 

This end is promoted here, by providing convenient buildings for 
study and residence, where young men who comply with the conditions 
of admission are welcomed and made comfortable ; and by the diligent 
training of the students in all the parts of such an education. 

All the income of the Institution, from endowment and from 
annual contributions, is used in favor of the students to keep the neces- 
sary charges for instruction and for living dowm to the lowest possible 
figure, so as to bring the benefits provided here within the reach of all 
who are willing to combine self-support with aid. 

In this Institution the college bill is only $121.50. 

Every charge in the college bill is essential. If the full amount is 
not paid by the students or for them, the benevolent fund supplied by 
the friends of the work must be divided among a smaller number. 
Any student using more than his necessities require, is taking funds for 
his own selfish uses, to which others have a right for their mental and 
spiritual improvement. His expensive or wasteful habits keep some 
other young man in ignorance, and prevent perhaps a better workman 
than himself from entering the harvest field. To take any amount of 
such benevolent funds in excess of strict necessity is selfish and dis- 
honest. No good man will gratify his own pride or indolence at the 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



expense of another man's usefulness. No student could be regarded 
as a friend of the colored people who would for his own enjoyment 
hinder other willing workers from the fitness which would give them 
success. 

Each student is under obligations of fairness, and honor, and hon- 
esty, and also of benevolence, to do all he can to support himself, and 
thus aid others who are equally with himself deserving of encourage- 
ment. 

PERSONAL EXPENSES. 

An exact estimate of the personal expenses of a student, above 
what is included in the session bills, cannot be made. 

He must have Text Books for each year of the course. 

He must have a lamp, and supply it with oil, to add the evenings 
to the days of study. 

The purchase and repair of clothing is a recurring necessity. 

He cannot travel to and from the University without money to 
pay his fare. 

If he becomes sick, there is the doctor's bill and the expense of 
medicine. 

The Literary Societies justly require annual contributions. 

The University cannot aid the student in these expenses either by 
gifts or loans. 

It is not the purpose of its patrons to relieve the student from the 
necessity of making provision for his own personal wants. 

Herein especially they exact his co-operation. 

Each student must provide beforehand to meet them, or they will 
distress him. 

His indifference, or carelessness, procures his suffering. 

He should carefully estimate them, and write them down, and sum 
them up, and keep the aggregate before his thoughts. 

And besides securing home assistance, he should be industrious in 
his vacations, to increase his honest earnings in every lawful way, and 
should honorably save them for these uses. To spend his earnings in 
superfluities, or in extravagancies, is to squander them, and to barter 
his education for his enjoyments. 

After every effort and economy he will not escape the discipline of 
want. In enduring this discipline he is practicing a virtue. 

A manly struggle will help to subdue pride and cultivate reliance 
on God. 

In a student struggling with poverty for an education, any luxu- 
rious indulgence is a disabling vice. He must conquer it, or it will 
cripple him in his equipments and in his powers. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



His wise friends may sympathize with him in his trials, but they 
will not excuse him from the acquisition of self-denial and thereby of 
self-control. 

The common judgment is that he who will not endure the 

TRIAL IS NOT WORTH THE HELP. 

Cigarette smoking is prohibited. 

All smoking in the halls and public rooms is forbidden. 

The whole tobacco habit is discouraged. 

The use of distilled or fermented liquors is prohibited. 

Many benevolent friends of the Negro are co-operating with the 
Trustees and Faculty in providing aid for those who will use their 
education for the good of others. Careful discrimination is exercised 
in directing this aid to individuals, so as not to weaken the sense of 
personal responsibility and self-reliance. Those who can pay their 
own bills have only to comply with the regulations, and they will be 
admitted to the standing in the classes for which their previous training 
has fitted them ; but no earnest young man of good abilities and good 
moral character should be discouraged from seeking the advantages 
which are here offered. Applicants should apply for admission to the 
President, or to some member of the Faculty, and state in their appli- 
cation their purpose in seeking an education, what progress they have 
made in study, and their ability to meet the expenses of education. 

BOARDING. 

The students board in clubs, or in boarding-houses adjacent to the 
University. The cost of board cannot be fixed at an unvarying rate 
from year to year. During the current year board and washing have 
been furnished for nine dollars per month. 

LIBRARY. 

The Library contains about fourteen thousand bound volumes, and 
four thousand magazines and miscellaneous pamphlets. 

The Librarian acknowledges with much pleasure the receipt of 
three hundred and sixty-one volumes given to the Library during the 
past year. 

The larger portion of the above-mentioned books were given to 
students about to graduate, or to those already on the fields of mission- 
ary labor in the South. 

There have been added to the library by purchase, 146 volumes 
and 81 pamphlets. 

The reading room which is open every day (except Sabbaths) is 
supplied with a number of daily and weekly papers, and monthly and 
quarterly reviews. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



RESIDENCE OF STUDENTS. 

Maryland, .31 Tennessee, 3 

9 



Pennsylvania, 31 j New York, . • 

Virginia, 29 Rhode Island, .... 

North Carolina, 28 | Texas, 2 

South Carolina, 27 ■ Connecticut, 1 



New Jersey, 11 

Georgia, 8 



Florida, 1 

Mississippi, 1 



Arkansas, 7 | Liberia, 3 

Delaware, 5 West Africa, 1 

Kentucky, 3 I West Indies, 1 

CALENDAR. 

The- Academical year is divided into two sessions. A recess of one 
week is taken in the second sesston. 
Meeting of Presbytery of Chester, .......... April 3, 1894. 

Examinations in Theological Department, . . April 13 and 16, 1894. 
Annual Sermon to the Theological Students, . . . April 15, 1894. 
Commencement in Theological Department, .... April 17, 1894. 

Recess in current year. April 19 to 26, 1894. 

Senior Final Examination, April 27 to May 4, 1894. 

Annual Examinations, May 24 to May 30, 1894. 

Anniversary of Philosophian Sociecty, May 31, 1894. 

Anniversary Garnet Literary Association, June 1, 1894. 

Baccalaureate Sermon, June 3, 1894. 

Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees, June 4, 1894. 

Class Day, June 4, 1894. 

Junior Contest, June 5, 1894. 

Commencement in the Collegiate Department, .... June 5, 1894. 

SUMMER VACATION. 

June 5th-Septernber 20th, 1894. 
THIRTY-NINTH ACADEMICAL YEAR. 

First Session Collegiate Department, September 20, 1894. 

First Session Theological Department, September 20, 1894. 

Close of First Session, December 20, 1894. 

WINTER VACATION. 

December 20th, 1894— January 3, 1895. 

Opening of Second Session in all departments, . . . January 3, 1895. 



10 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



d>oPfegiafe Qeparfmeaf. 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 



Rev. ISAAC N. KENDALL, D. D., President, 
Psychology and Logic. 

Rev. GILBERT T. WOODHULL, D. D ., 

Charles Avery Professor of Greek. 
Rev. JOHN B. RENDALL, A. M., 

John H. Cassidy Professor of Latin. 

Rev. SAMUEL A. MARTIN, D. D., 

Wm. E. Dodge Professor of Rhetoric. 

J. CRAIG MILLER, M. D., 

Wm. A. Halliday Professor of Natural Science. 

Rev. J. ASPINWALL HODGE, D. D., 

Mrs. David Brown Professor of Biblical Instruction. 

WALTER L. WRIGHT, Jr., A. B., 

Reuben J. Flick Professor of Mathematics. 

Rev. W. D. KERSWILL, A. M., 

Henry A. Kerr Professor of History. 

JAMES R. BARRETT, A. M., 

Instructor in Rhetoric. 

CHARLES E. TUCKER, A. B., 

Instructor in Greek. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 11 



STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS, 



Jefferson C. Anderson, New York, N. Y. 

William M. Berry, Conowingo, Md. 

Julian F. Blodgett, Augusta, Ga. 

George R. Brabham, Beaufort, S. C. 

William F. Bronaugh, Lynchburg, Va. 

Edward P. Brown, Winchester, Va. 

James A. Browne, Darien, Ga. 

Augustus S. Clark, Wilson, N. C. 

Samuel P. C. Cowan, . Cotton Plant, Ark. 

William Davis, Corpus Christi, Tex. 

Edward J. H. Dickerson, Woodbury, N. J. 

Nathaniel L. Edwards, Raleigh, N. C. 

John M. Howerton, Scottsburg, Va. 

Frank M. Hyder, Johnson City, Tenn. 

Abram J. Jackson, West Chester, Pa. 

Thomas Jefferson, Staunton, Va. 

Samuel W. Johnson, Marietta, Pa. 

* Thomas H. Lackland, Farmville, Va. 

Stephen D. Leak, Troy, N. C. 

James S. Lennon . . Ansonia, Conn. 

Richard L. Lucas, Staunton, Va. 

Lewis J. McClellen, Blairsville, Pa. 

William W. McHenry, Lincoln University, Pa. 

George N. Marshall, . . . ■ Chestnut Knob, Va. 

Oscar H. Massey, Allegheny, Pa. 

Robert J. Morris, Danville, Pa. 

Charles H. Morton, Staunton, Va. 

Joshua P. Murphrey, Elm City, N. C. 

Charles S. Oliver, Baltimore, Md. 

* Pursuing special studies. 



12 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



SENIOR CLASS-Continued. 

Samuel A. Penn, Chestnut Knob,Va. 

William H. Pipes, Millington, Md. 

Stephen A. Potts, Trappe, Md. 

Perry W. Sewell, Baltimore, Md. 

Walter Shanks, Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Alexander P. Stanford, Baltimore, Md. 

Thomas H. Thomas, Providence, R. I. 

William H. Thomas, Providence, B. I. 

William H. Vick, Wilson, N. C. 

Richard D. Weeks, Wilmington, Del. 

Edward J. Wheatley, Baltimore, Md. 

William (). White, Baltimore, Md. 

Samuel D. Wingate, Mt. Vernon, Pa 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

John W. Bird, Wilmington, Del. 

Thomas J. Blakey, Bowling Green, Ky. 

John C. Brock, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Jerry M. Brumfield, Bowling Green, Ky. 

Henry P. Butler, Aiken, S. C. 

Harry W. Calloway, Baltimore, Md. 

Bassette E. Carter, Staunton, Va. 

Edward B. Clarkson, Orangeburg, S. C. 

Filmore Clarkson, Coatesville, Pa. 

Cain P. Cole, Aiken, S. C. 

Mack D. Coley, Fremont, N. C. 

Thomas J. Crawford, Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Charles G. Cummings, Baltimore, Md. 

William R. Dickerson, Woodbury, N. J. 

Charles B. Dunbar, Monrovia, Liberia. 

William Ellis, Staunton, Va. 

William O. Fields, Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Wallace L. Goodridge, Wrightsville, Pa. 

William E. Griffin, Baltimore, Md. 

Octavius D. Hall, . Conowingo, Md. 

James E. Harper, Abbeville, S. C. 

Jacob R. Howard, Baltimore, Md. 

Charles H. Hynson, Still Pond, Md. 

Henry C. Lassiter, Wilson, N. C. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 13 

JUNIOR CLASS— Continued. 

Jacob T. Lisby, Perrymansville, Md. 

Walter Mason, West Chester, Pa. 

William D. McKenzie, Franklinton, N. C. 

James H. McNiell, Fayetteville, N. C. 

Louis W. Oliver, Baltimore, Md. 

Richard U. Porter, Chatham, Pa. 

William H. Potts, Trappe, Md. 

John S. Prigg, West Chester, Pa. 

Albert R. Rankin, Natchez, Miss. 

Walter J. Scott, Oil City, Pa. 

Hyman C. Smith, Viola, Del. 

William B. Stitt, Matthews, N. C. 

Thomas M. Thomas, Orangeburg, S. C. 

Charles H. Tibbs, Danville, Ky. 

William P. Todd, . . Lexington, Va. 

Albert L. Tolbert, Robertsville, S. C. 

Charles W. M. Williams, Macon, Ga. 

Turner G. Williamson, Wilson, N. C. 

John H. Wilson, . . • Danville, Va. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Theodore A. Auten, Somerville, N. J. 

Thomas F. Bampfield, Charleston, S. C. 

Herbert G. Barrows, Oxford, Pa. 

Julian J. Benton, Augusta, Ga. 

Hugh M. Burkett, Baltimore. Md. 

Louis A. Coberth, Hellens, Md. 

James W. Dawkins, Carlisle, S. C. 

Coleman E. Gibson, Winston, N. C. 

Walter F. Hawkins, Port Deposit, Md. 

Lemuel C. Henson, London Grove, Pa. 

James A. Hilliard, Monticello, Ark. 

Peter P. Johnson, Franklinton, N. C. 

Morris H. Key, Baltimore, Md. 

Bollie Levister, Franklinton, N. C. 

Harry G. Lones, Wilmington, Del. 

James W. Porter, Richmond, Va. 

William H. Randolph, Coles Ferry, Va. 



14 LINCOLN UN TV 10 1 IS I TV. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS-Continued. 

Charles II. Roberts, Louisburg, N. C. 

Robert H. Scott, Fayetteville, N. C. 

Howard F. Stanley, Baltimore, Md. 

Aaron H. Thomasson, Monticello, Ark. 

William C. Todd, Petersburg, Va. 

James D. Turner, Baltimore, Md. 

Pink W. Watson, Palmer, Tex. 

Isaac E. Wilson, Norfolk, Va. 

William G. Wilson, Abbeyville, Va. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Richard G. Baker, Shippensburg, Pa. 

Edward E. Barry, Oxford, Pa. 

Robert S. Beadle, Grand Bassa, Liberia. 

Israel R. Berry, Aiken, S. C. 

Harry N. Collins, Oxford, Pa. 

Charles T. Craig, Somerville, N. J. 

John A. Davis, Winnsborough, S. C. 

James A. Deveaux, Beaufort, S. C. 

George E. Dickerson, Wenonah, N. J. 

Darius L. Donnell, Lincoln University, Pa. 

Isaac H. Dorsey, York, Pa. 

William Drewry, Martinsville, Va. 

Edward E. Edgell, Beaufort, S. C. 

Samuel H. Eggleton, Martinsville, Va. 

John B. Exum, Eureka, N. C 

Thomas J. Folks, Baltimore, Md. 

William H. Freeman, Wilson, N. C. 

Joel T. Fuller, Franklinton, N. C. 

John B. Gardner, - . . . . Cobham, Va. 

Egbert M. Gill, Wakeforest, N. C. 

Bruce H. Green, Charleston, S. C. 

David N. Green, Beaufort, S. C. 

Frank M. Hendrick, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cesar K. Hill, Chester, S. C. 

Thomas H. Jackson, Baltimore, Md. 

Avery W. James, Mont Clair, N. J. 

Frank H. Jones, Newark, N. J. 

Charles H. Male, St. Kitts, W. I. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 15 



FRESHMAN CLASS— Continued. 

Alfred H. E. Mann, Oil City, Pa. 

Fletcher R. McGee, Danville, Va. 

George S. Miller, Thebes, Ga. 

Joseph W. Miller, Baltimore, Md. 

John E. Morris, Aikin, S. C. 

Joseph D. Mullinax, Brinkley, Ark. 

Amos K. Newton, Wilmington, N. C. 

Albert K. Peabody, Little Bassa, W. Africa. 

Walter Penn, Chestnut Knob, Va. 

Middleton E. Pickens, Winnsborough, S. C. 

James H. Press, Cape Charles, Va. 

Emile J. Ravennah, Gillisonville, S. C. 

Samuel T. Redd, Martinsville, Va. 

Lewis W. Richie, . Abbeville, S. C. 

Clarence A. Robinson, Beaufort, S. C. 

William B. Romans, . . Abbeville, S. C. 

William W. Sanders, Martinsville, Va. 

William M. Slowe, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Isaac R. Strawbridge, New London, Pa. 

James T. Suggs, Wilson, N. C. 

J. C. Swann, Lothian, Md. 

J. M. Swann, Lothian, Md. 

Ulysses V. Thompson, Baltimore, Md. 

Tobias Vaughn, Germantown, Pa. 

Harry A. Voder y, Baltimore, Md. 

William W. Walker, Palatka, Fla. 

Henry H. Wayman, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bloomer E. White, Macon, Ga. 

John A. White, Suffolk, Va. 

John U. Wilson, Pine Bluff, Ark. 

John H. Williams, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



16 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



REGULATIONS. 

The course of study in the Collegiate Department occupies four 
years. 

Applicants for the Freshman Class must be at least fifteen years of 
age. They will be examined in Spelling, English Grammar, Composi- 
tion of simple sentences, Geography, History of the United States, the 
Book of Genesis and the Gospel according to Mark, Arithmetic, 
especially common and decimal fractions, percentage, proportion and 
square root, Latin Grammar and Lessons, Greek Grammar, and 
Lessons. 

Candidates for advanced standing will be examined in the studies 
previously pursued by the class which they propose to enter. 

The Academical year is divided into two sessions. At the end of 
each session public examinations of all the classes are held. Absence 
from an examination, except for sufficient reason, sustained by vote of 
the Faculty, will be regarded as a serious delinquency, and cannot be 
made good by any subsequent examination. No student can be con- 
tinued in full standing in his class who does not pass all these exami- 
nations. 

At the close of each year all the classes are examined, either orally 
or in writing, in the studies of that year. 

The rank of a student in his class depends on his grade in his 
recitations and examinations; on his punctuality and constancy in 
attendance upon all exercises of instruction ; and on his deportment 
and character in all his relations as a student. 

At the close of the Senior year the members of the Senior class are 
examined in the studies of the whole course. 

In determining the final rank of a Senior his grade in the final 
Senior examination is combined with the final grades of the previous 
collegiate years. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Annual Commencement will take place on Tuesday, the fifth 
day of June, 1894, at 2 P.M. 

The Junior contest will take place on the fifth day of June, at 
10.30 A. M. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 17 



On Commencement day the members of the Senior class, to whom 
orations are assigned, speak in the order of their rank ; except that 
the valedictorian, who is chosen from the highest third of the class 
arranged according to the rank of the members, delivers the closing 
address. 

Special honorary orations are assigned, at the discretion of the 
Faculty, to members of the Senior class who may have excelled in 
particular branches of study. 

Students who complete the whole course of collegiate study satis- 
factorily to the Faculty and Board of Trustees, will receive the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts, and may obtain a diploma certifying their 
graduation. 

All degrees authorized by the Board of Trustees are announced by 
the Secretary of the Board and conferred by the President of the 
University during the progress of che Commencement exercises. 

The collegiate year closes with the exercises on Commencement 
day, and is followed by the summer vacation. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 
FRESHMAN CLASS. 

FIRST SESSION. SECOND SESSION. 

Review of Syntax. Parsing. Analysis. Elements of Rhetoric. 

Algebra. Algebra. 

Leighton's Greek Lessons. Caesar (Gallic War). 

Goodwin's Greek Grammar. Leighton's Greek Lessons. 

Leighton's Latin Lessons. Anabasis. 

Allen & Grenough's Latin Grammar. Bible. — Pentateuch. 

Bible. — Pentateuch. History. 

History. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

FIRST SESSION. SECOND SESSION. 

Principles of Philology. Mythology. 

Critical Study of English Classics. English Classics. 

English History. Geometry.' 

Algebra. Physics. 

Physical Geography. Cicero. 

Physics. Anabasis, continued. 

Sallust. Bible. — Historical Books. 

Xenophon (Anabasis). English History. 

Bible. — Historical Books. 



18 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



FIRST SESSION. 

Trench on Words. 

Logic. 

Geometry. 

Chemistry and Physiology. 

Virgil. 

Arnold's Latin Prose Composition. 

Homer (Odyssey) and Memorabilia. 

Bible — Historical Books. 



SECOND SESSION. 

Rhetoric and Philology. 

Logic. 

Trigonometry. 

Physiology and Chemistry. 

Tacitus. 

Arnold's Latin Prose. 

Homer, or Memorabilia. 

Bible — Historical Books. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



FIRST SESSION. 

History of English Literature. 

Essays and Reviews. 

Psychology. 

Plato's Crito. 

Horace. 

Trigonometry. 

Geology. 

Bible — Poetical Books. 



SECOND SESSION. 

History of English Literature. 

Analytic Geometry. 

Theism. 

Ethics. 

Plato, Lysias. 

Horace. 

Evidence of Christianity. 

Social Science. 

Astronomy. 

Bible — Gospel History. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

The student, on entering the Freshman Class, must be well 
acquainted with the essentials of English Grammar. The first half 
of the Freshman year is devoted to review of syntax and exercises in 
parsing and analysis of sentences. The elements of rhetoric are then 
taught, and at the end of the Freshman year the student must be able 
to write English correctly and in good literary style. 

The principles of philology are taught at the beginning of the 
Sophomore year, and made familiar by the critical study of English 
classics. Bunyan, Milton and Shakespeare are taken as representative 
English authors, and the works are studied with the care usually 
bestowed on the Latin and Greek classics. This study of English 
classics extends over the whole of the Sophomore and Junior years, 
and is kept in close connection with a thorough course in rhetoric and 
philology. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 19 



During the Senior year the history of English literature is studied 
by text-book and direct acquaintance with the standard literature of 
all ages. During the whole course, essays, reviews and criticisms are 
required very frequently. 

LOGIC. 

Logic is taught in the Junior year. The Logic of Dr. James 
McCosh, of Princeton, is used as a text-book. Special attention is 
paid to the nature and formation of the notion. The discernment of the 
student is constantly tested by practical examples in judgment and in 
mediate inference. And his proficiency is promoted by exercises in 
current reasonings on various topics and in common fallacies. 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

The student is assisted to make a survey of the whole field of the 
soul's activities, and made acquainted with its distinctive powers and 
faculties, by text-book aud oral instruction. 

The Emotions are studied in the groups in which human language 
presents them. The theory of the emotions is then discussed in lec- 
tures and verbal examinations. 

MORAL SCIENCE. 

All these departments of Psychology lead to Moral Science as their 
noblest application. Here the student is directed to study and apply 
the law of right and duty as resting on the authority of God, whose 
will, revealed in whatever way, is the test and law both of all opinion 
and of all obedience. 

THE ENGLISH BIBLE. 

The Authorized Version of the English Bible is studied by all the 
classes in all the departments of the University. The Minion 12mo. 
Ref. edition of the American Bible Society is an inexpensive and suit- 
able text-book. The student needs also Cruden's Concordance, un- 
abridged, and a reliable Bible Dictionary. 

For admission to the Freshman class, applicants are required to 
pass a satisfactory examination in Genesis and the Gospel of Mark. 

During the Collegiate years the course of study embraces the his- 
torical and poetical portions of the Bible. Special attention is given 
to the mutual relations of the several books, and especially their pre- 
sentations of the one plan of salvation by Jesus Christ. The commit- 
ting of Scripture to memory is regarded as an important part of the 
course. 



20 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



MATHEMATICS. 

The Freshman year and the first term of the Sophomore year are 
devoted to the study of Algebra. The text-book is Wells' University 
Algebra. Euclid is used as the text-book in Geometry. Special 
emphasis is laid upon the demonstration of original theorems and 
problems. 

The essential principles of Trigonometry are carefully studied 
including their application to the measurement of heights and the 
surveying of land. Instruction is given in the practical use of sur- 
veying instruments, the determination of heights, and the measurement 
of areas. 

Wentworth's text-book is used in Analytic Geometry. The course 
includes the study of the straight line, the circle, the parabola, the 
ellipse and the hyperbola. 

NATURAL SCIENCE. 

The studies at present embraced in this department are Physiology, 
Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, Physical Geography, Geology and 
Astronomy. 

Physiology and the allied sciences, Anatomy and Hygiene, are 
taught by lectures with the aid of a text-book, and illustrated by skele- 
ton, plates, casts and microscope. It is the design of the instructor to 
give a course which will be of practical use to the students in after life. 

Natural Philosophy and Chemistry are taught as much as possible 
by means of experiments with Physical and Chemical appliances. 

The course on Physical Geography is such as is usually given in 
colleges. 

In Geology and Astronomy the aim is to teach the student as much 
as is usually known of these branches by educated persons, and suffi- 
cient to furnish a ground-work for further attainments, should any see 
fit to pursue them further. 

HISTORY. 

In the Freshman year a study is made of the general history of 
the world from the beginning of ancient history to the present century. 
The aim of this course is to make the map of history stand out clearly 
before each student, so that he may not only have a comprehensive 
view of the history of the world as a whole, but also a distinct idea of 
the relative and causal connection between the great events of history. 
The text-book used is Freeman's General Sketch. 

In the Sophomore class the History of England is studied. Special 
attention is given to tracing the great social, political and religious 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 21 



movements which have affected the English people, and have left a 
permanent mark upon their life and institutions. The text-book used 
is J. R. Green's " Short History of the English People." 

CLASSICAL GREEK. 

Instruction in this department extends through the whole Collegiate 
Course. Special effort is made in the later years of the course to rise 
above details of construction to the criticism of the thought and style 
of the authors read, and to secure to the student the advantages of 
exactness and precision in his own thinking, and of readiness and pro- 
priety in expression. 

LATIN. 

The authors read are Csesar, Sallust, Virgil, Horace, Cicero and 
Tacitus. The course also includes Arnold's Latin Prose Composition 
and selections from various authors. 

The students in the early part of their course are thoroughly 
drilled in the analysis of sentences and grammatical structure. After 
this the questions are largely philological, and derivation receives 
special attention. 

When the Poetic Authors are reached, the students give attention 
to versification, while the Mythological references of Virgil and of 
Horace are carefully studied. 

The Professor of Rhetoric has requested that, as far as it might be 
conveniently done, the valuable rhetorical suggestions of Horace might 
be emphasized. This is done, and thus the various departments of 
instruction are made to help each other. The latter portions of the 
course furnish occasion to bring out the style and spirit of their authors. 

HONORS FOR THE YEAR 1892-93. 

The Junior Contest took place in Livingstone Hall, on Tuesday, 
June 6th, 1893. The contestants appointed by the Faculty were as 
follows : 



William Davis, . . 
Charles H. Morton 
Robert J. Morris . 
Joshua P. Murphrei 
William H. Pipes . 
Augustus S. Clark . 



. Texas . ... Aggressive Forces. 

. Virginia .... The Intellect a Power. 

. Pennsylvania . . Application of Forces. 

. North Carolina . Constancy. 

. Maryland - . . Man's Power over Nature. 

. North Carolina. Pass On. 



The first prize, a gold medal, marked A, was awarded to William 
H. Pipes, Maryland. 

The second prize, a gold medal, marked B, was awarded to Augustus 
S Clark, of North Carolina. 



22 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



The Bradley Medal, for highest average grade in Natural Science, 
during the Senior year, was awarded to Byron S. Johnson, of Virginia. 

The General Scientific Prize, a gold medal, for the highest average 
grade in Natural Science during the whole course, was awarded to 
William W. McHenry, of Pennsylvania, of the Junior Class. 

The English Prize, for the best grade in English during the Sopho- 
more year, was awarded to Albert R. Rankin, of Mississippi. 



COMMENCEMENT APPOINTMENTS. 

Class of 1893. 



Benjamin B. Jeffers, 
Thomas Coleman, . . 
Byron S. Johnson, 
George E. Cannon, . 
William H. Burnett, 
William B. Williams, 
Fannin S. Belcher, . 
John W. Brown, . . 
James S. Leneer, . . 



. Maryland, .... Valedictory Oration. 

. Georgia, Latin Salutatory. 

■ Virginia, .... Scientific Oration. 

. South Carolina, . . Mathematical Oration. 

. Texas, Classical Oration. 

. Virginia, Philological Oration. 

. Georgia, Biblical Oration. 

. Virginia, Historical Oration. 

. North Carolina, . . Psychological Oration. 



The degree of A. B., in course, was conferred on the following 
members of the Senior class. Their names are printed in the order 
of their rank : 

Thomas Coleman, Georgia. 

Byron S. Johnson, Virginia. 

Benjamin B. Jeffers, Maryland. 

George E. Cannon, South Carolina. 

William H. Burnett, Texas. 

William B. Williams, Virginia. 

Fannin S. Belcher, Georgia. 

John W. Brown, Virginia, 

James S. Leneer, North Carolina. 

Allen C. Bradley, South Carolina. 

Charles N. Williams, North Carolina. 

Joseph C Wright, South Carolina. 

William H. Clark, North Carolina. 

Stephen W. Long, Maryland. 

Isaac A. Jennings, Virginia. 

William T. Ritchie, South Carolina. 

Harry B. Keech, Pennsylvania. 

Charles S. Blake, Delaware. 

William S. Morris, Delaware. 

Horace G Dwigoins, Kansas. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 23 



John H. Hayswood, North Carolina. 

Alonzo S. Gray, South Carolina. 

William E. Jefferson, Virginia. 

Freeman Oliver, Maryland. 

Newman Freeland, North Carolina. 

Samuel J. Bamfield, South Carolina. 

William H. Freeland, North Carolina. 

The following members of the Senior class, English course, received 
certificates of having completed that course : 

Stephen C. Doby, South Carolina. 

Sidney P. Johnson, North Carolina. 



EXPENSES. 

FIRST SESSION. 

Tuition, $10 00 

Coal, 5 00 

Furniture, 2 50 

Library, 1 00 

Board and Washing, 31 50— $50 00 

SECOND SESSION. 

Tuition, $15 00 

Coal, 8 00 

Furniture 2 50 

Library, 1 00 

Board and Washing, 45 00— $71 50 

$121 50 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

The Garnet Literary Association and the Philosophian Society 
meet every Friday evening. The literary exercises consist of speaking, 
composition and debate. All the members are required to take part 
in these exercises. The societies are governed by laws adopted by 
themselves, and administered by officers chosen from their own mem- 
bers, under the general supervision of the Faculty of Arts. 



I 

24 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



Preparatory ©eparfmerrT, 



The Preparatory Department has not been opened during the current year. 



Five students in preparatory studies have been under the care of the 
University in other schools. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 25 



(Ufteofogicaf department. 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 



Rev. ISAAC N. RENDALL, D. D., President. 
Rev. GILBERT T. WOODHULL, D. D., 

Charles Avery Professor of Greek and New Testament Literature. 

Rev. SAMUEL A. MARTIN, D. D., 

William E. Dodge Professor of Sacred Rhetoric. 

Rev. J. ASPINWALL HODGE, D. D., 

Mrs. David Brown Professor of Instruction in the English Version of the Bible. 

Rev. ROBERT L. STEWART, A. M., 

Professor of Pastoral Theology, Evidences of Christianity and Biblical Archaeology. 

Rev. WILLIAM DEAS KERSWILL, A. M., 

Henry A. Kerr Professor of Hebrew and Church History. 

Rev. JOHN B. RENDALL, A. M., 

Instructor in Ecclesiastical Latin. 

Rev. WILLIAM R. BINGHAM, D. D., 

John C. Baldwin Instructor in Theology. 



26 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



STUDENTS. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Daniel B. Anderson, Philadelphia, Pa. 

*Luke B. Anthony, ..• Liberia. 

Powhatan Bagnall, Norfolk, Va. 

James R. Barrett, Danville, Va. 

Edward W. Coberth, Hellens, Md. 

Lylburn L. Downing, Atlantic City, N. J. 

William H. Peden, Fountain Inn, S. C. 

William Henry Shields, Burlington, N. J. 

MIDDLE CLASS. 

David S. Collier, Abbeville, S. C. 

George R. Coverdale, Germantown, Pa. 

Howard T. Jason, Hockessin, Del. 

Amos P. M. Johnson, Holly Beach, N. J. 

Dublin B. Miller, Mcintosh, Ga. 

Albert R. Rideout, Baltimore, Md. 

Charles E. Tucker, New Berne, N. C. 

Josiah P. Woolridge, Troy, S. C. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

William H. Clark, Wilson, N. C. 

Thomas Coleman, Augusta, Ga. 

Stephen C. Doby, Camden, S. C. 

William H. Freeland, Mebane, N. C. 

Alonso S. Gray, Enterprise, S. C. 

John H. Hayswood, Louisburg, N. C. 

Ephraim A. Johnson, Camden, N. J. 

Sydney P. Johnson, Raleigh, N. C. 

Albert Sydney Long, Franklinton, N. C. 

Robert Murray, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Joseph S. White, Philadelphia, Pa. 

William B. Williams, West Chester, Pa. 

William R. Williams, Norfolk, Va. 

* Engaged in Medical Studies. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 27 



REGULATIONS. 

The course of study in the Theological Department occupies three 
years. 

Applicants for admission to the privileges of the Theological 
Department must present evidence of membership in good standing 
in some Evangelical church. 

Students who complete the full course of theological study to the 
satisfaction of the Faculty and the Board of Trustees, will receive the 
degree of Bachelor of Sacred Theology and a diploma certifying their 
graduation. 

All persons not graduates of the Collegiate Department of Lincoln 
University, or of some other collegiate institution, applying to be 
admitted to this department as candidates for the degree of S. T. B., 
must pass a satisfactory examination in the collegiate studies. But 
applicants who have not pursued a course of classical training may, 
at the discretion of the Faculty, be admitted to particular classes, or 
to the English course of instruction. Such students, on leaving the 
University, will be entitled to certificates in evidence of their attend- 
ance on instruction, and of the time spent in study. 

The Academical year is divided into two sessions. At the close 
of the second session the students are examined on the studies of the 
current year. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Homiletics. Sacred Geography. 

New Testament Introduction. Biblical Archaeology. 

History of English Version. Hebrew. 

Life of Christ. Apologetics (Natural Religion). 

Systematic Theology. Ecclesiastical Latin. 

MIDDLE YEAR. 

Systematic Theology. Exegesis (Epistles). 

Biblical Archaeology (Historical The Gospels (Life of our Lord). 

Evidences). Ecclesiastical History. 

Homiletics. Church Government. 

Pastoral Theology (Pastoral Pauline Epistles. 

Epistles). Pastoral Theology. 

Hebrew and Introduction to Apologetics. 

the Prophets. 



28 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Systematic Theology. The Acts. 

Homiletics. Pastoral Theology. 

Hebrew and Introduction to Church Government. 

the Poetical Books. Bible (Prophecies). 

Ecclesiastical History. Polemics. 

Exegesis (Epistles). Apologetics. 

Throughout the course particular attention is paid to the prepara- 
tion and delivery of sermons. 

ENGLISH COURSE. 
FIRST YEAR. SECOND YEAR. 

Homiletics. Homiletics. 

Life of Christ. Biblical Antiquities. 

Systematic Theology. Systematic Theology. 

Sacred Geography. Pastoral Theology. 

Apologetics. Church Government. 

Ecclesiastical History. Ecclesiastical History. 

Polemics. Bible (Pauline Epistles). 

Ethics. 

ENGLISH BIBLE. 

The design of the Board of Trustees in establishing this Chair is to 
secure that no student shall be graduated from the Theological De- 
portment of this Institution without acquiring a thorough knowledge 
of the Bible in the English language. 

To this end the Board of Trustees enjoins it upon the Faculty of 
Theology to require the students under the direction of the incumbent 
of this Chair to read the whole Bible carefully and studiously, and to 
commit to memory such passages as may be assigned to them with this 
design. 

Instruction is given on the versions of the Sacred Scriptures, espe- 
cially on the history of the English Version. The fourfold record of 
the life of Christ, the Epistles of Paul and the Prophetical books of 
the Old and New Testaments are carefully taught. Before entering 
the Theological course the student is expected to be familiar with the 
historical and poetical portions of the Scriptures. And while in this 
department they should read the whole Bible with studious and rever- 
ent attention. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 29 



CHURCH GOVERNMENT. 

The various forms of Church Government which exist in the 
Church are minutely considered and compared with the principles of 
government laid down in the Bible. 

The details of Presbyterian Polity and Modes of Discipline are 
theoretically and practically taught. 

HEBREW. 

Hebrew is taught throughout the three years : 

The Junior Year is given to acquiring an exact knowledge of 
the language, the black-board being constantly used in teaching. The 
grammatical peculiarities of the language and a vocabulary compris- 
ing Hebrew words of most frequent occurrence are gradually acquired ; 
these are practically applied from the first in writing Hebrew prose 
upon the board in the class-room, and corrected before the class or 
in writing exercises at home. 

Dr. Green's large Hebrew Grammar is in the hands of each student 
as a permanent reference book. Gen. i.-xv. is read during the latter 
part of the session. 

In the Middle Year a careful, exegetical study is made of some 
portion of the Prophetical Books — this year the Book of Zechariah. 
Sight reading is pursued in other portions of the Prophetical Books. 
Introductory Lectures are delivered upon the Minor Prophets, en- 
deavoring to set forth the circumstances and the exact import of each 
book. 

In the Senior Year some portion of the Poetical Books is studied 
exegetically — this year the Messianic Psalms. Other selections from the 
Poetical Books are read as sight-reading. 

Introductory Lectures are delivered upon the Poetical Books. 

A carefully prepared Hebrew Critical Exercise upon some passage 
of the Old Testament is required of each member of the Senior Class. 

CHURCH HISTORY. 

Church History is taught throughout the Middle and Senior Years i 
covering in the two years the History of the Christian Church from 
Apostolic times to the present. 

The aim of the course is not to notice every detail, but to place 
such emphasis upon the important events and transitions of various 
periods as will make each student able to state clearly and exactly the 
cause and nature of all such events, and to enable him to take an in- 
telligent survey of the whole field of the Church's existence. 



30 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



Each student is required to write a carefully prepared thesis each 
year upon some assigned subject within the sphere of the year's work, 
requiring independent research. 

Middle Year. — From Apostolic Times to the Protestant Refor- 
mation. 

Senior Year. — From the beginning of the Protestant Reforma- 
tion to the Present. 

The Text-Book in both years is " Fisher's History of the Christian 
Church." 

NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE. 

The Manuscripts and Canon of the New Testament. Special In- 
troduction to the New Testament Books. The life of our Lord and 
Harmony of the Gospels. New Testament Grammar and Exegesis. 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY, EVIDENCES OF CHRIS- 
TIANITY, AND BIBLICAL THEOLOGY. 

The establishment of a new chair in the Theological Department 
gives opportunity for a wider range and a more thorough course of 
preparatory study in Practical Theology, Christian Evidences and 
Biblical Archaeology. 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY. 

The course of study in Pastoral Theology will cover two years of 
the curriculum ; and has been arranged with a view to the practical 
treatment of every phase of activity and influence which belongs to 
the Christian Pastorate. 

Special emphasis will be given to the subjective training of candi- 
dates for the holy office ; and, with this end in view, the Pastoral Epis- 
tles will be carefully studied at the beginning of the course. 

CHRISTIAN EVIDENCES. 

The range of studies under this head will include, in general, the 
grounds of Theistic and Christian belief. 

The aim will be to present in connected form the evidences — drawn 
from all sources — of natural and revealed religion. 

In connection with the study of Biblical Archaeology one session 
will be devoted to the evidences of the truth of the Sacred Scriptures 
from the monumental records of the past. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 31 



BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY. 

A definite and accurate knowledge of the Social, Religious and 
Political Life of the Nations of the East in Bible times will be the 
object of this study. 

Special attention will be given to the rapidly accumulating testi- 
monies of modern discovery and research ; and, whenever necessary, 
the subject matter of the text book will by supplemented by lectures 
and stereopticon illustrations. 

The topography and general features of the lands of the Bible will 
be carefully studied in the first session of the Junior Year. 

Analyses of the subjects treated, outlined maps and essays on 
special themes will be required during the course. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY. 

Systematic Theology is begun in the Junior Year, and continued 
through the entire course. For the present, Rev. Wm. R. Bingham, 
D. D., is conducting this course of instruction. " The outlines of The- 
ology," by Dr. A. A. Hodge, is used as a text book. 

The students are diligently instructed in the Decreto Centric Sys- 
tem of Theology, embodied in our Westminster Standards. The exer- 
cises of the Class Room often assume the form of mutual question and 
answer for the sake of a clearer insight into the difficulties and their 
more satisfactory collation. The aim is always to trace the truth 
received to its source in the Bible as the very word of God. 

ECCLESIASTICAL LATIN. 

One hour a week in Latin is assigned to the Junior Class. The 
last class has read Latin hymns. The day has not yet come when 
Protestant Christians can afford to lay aside the knowledge of the 
tongue in which the Latin Church publishes its dogmas and decress to 
the world for information, if not for obedience. Our own Church still 
exacts a Latin Thesis from her candidates for the ministry. And this 
course is completed by such a Thesis, required of each member of the 
class. The course is conducted by Professor J. B. Kendall. 

SACRED RHETORIC. 

The purpose of this department is two-fold : First, to form in the 
mind of the student a high and correct ideal of gospel preaching. To 
this end he is first made familiar with the theory of preaching, using 
Dr. Broadus' " Preparation and Delivery of Sermons," as a text-book. 



32 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



He is then required to study the lives and work of some of the great 
preachers of ancient and modern times, and to write reviews of the 
same. In connection with this work he is made acquainted with the 
standard hymns of the Church, with their history and authorship. 

Second : to cultivate the best means of reaching this ideal. The 
student is trained to write in a clear and simple style, He is next 
required to analyze texts assigned to him, and to construct skeletons 
of sermons. At the beginning of the second year, some book of the 
New Testament is selected the whole book analyzed, and a number of 
sermons written during the year covering the whole contents of the 
book. In assigning these subjects, care is taken to give opportunity 
for exercise in expository sermonizing as well as topical and texual. 

During the Middle and Senior Year, the students are required to 
preach without manuscript. 

THE ENGLISH THEOLOGICAL COURSE. 

In the year 1876 the Board of Trustees of Lincoln University 
addressed the following memorial and overture to the General Assem- 
bly of the Presbyterian Church : 

" The Board of Trustees of Lincoln University, deeply interested 
in the condition of the Freedmen, and convinced that their continued 
destitution of an authorized educated ministry is a reproach to the 
Church and a source of danger to the country, respectfully urge the 
General Assembly to devise and adopt some practical plan to supply 
this want ; and overture the Assembly to consider and act upon the 
following propositions : 

" First. — Resolved, That this Assembly recognize it as the imperative 
duty of the Church to send the Gospel to the Freedmen without delay. 

" Second — That while in the considerate judgment of this Assembly 
the regulations embodied in the fourteenth chapter of the Form of 
Government respecting the trial of candidates for licensure are an 
authoritative guide to Presbyteries in determining their qualifications, 
they do not supersede the discretion of the Presbyteries in the respon- 
sibility of committing the ministry of the word to faithful men. 

" Third. — That all Presbyteries providentially brought into rela- 
tions with the Freedmen be hereby advised to license all colored men 
of whose call to preach the gospel they may be satisfied, and whose 
training and abilities they may deem sufficient to qualify them for this 
sacred work. 

" Fourth. — That the Board of Education be instructed to assume 
in behalf of the Church the pecuniary responsibility of educating in a 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 33 



thorough course of Theological studies in the English language all 
colored candidates for the ministry recommended to their care by the 
Presbyteries." 

To this memorial and overture the Assembly returned the following 
answer : 

" First. — The Assembly has no authority to modify the regulations 
of our Form of Government in respect to qualifications of licentiates 
so as to make provision for any class of exceptional cases. At the 
same time the Assembly recognizes the propriety of the exercise, by 
Presbyteries, of a wise discretion in their administration of the func- 
tions intrusted to them by the Church, in view of the great work to be 
done by our Church among the colored people in this country. The 
Assembly specially accords such discretion to those Presbyteries which 
are providentially brought into special relations to that work ; mean- 
while, in view of the experience of several years, enjoining upon such 
Presbyteries the obligation to take great care lest incompetent or 
unworthy men be admitted into the ministry of our Church. 

" Second. — This General Assembly does not deem it wise to modify 
the existing rules governing the Board of Education in the aiding of 
candidates for the ministry in our Church. The Assembly, however, 
earnestly commend the exceptional cases, referred to in the overture 
to the sympathy and charity of the Churches, and trust that the 
friends of our work among the Freedmen will suffer no worthy young 
man, devoting himself to that work, to fail for lack of pecuniary aid." 
— Minutes of the General Assembly, 1876. 

This answer of the General Assembly virtually affirms the first 
proposition, that it is the duty of the Church to send the Gospel to the 
Freedmen without delay. The Assembly specially accords to particular 
Presbyteries discretion in licensing, as preachers of the Gospel, candi- 
dates who have been exercised in a thorough course of Theological 
studies in the English language, according to the second and third 
propositions. And although the Assembly did not instruct the Board 
of Education to adopt a wider policy in supporting colored candidates 
for the ministry, its past policy, which has been liberal, was not re- 
stricted. The education of colored men in a thorough course of Theo- 
logical studies in the English language was commended by the Assem- 
bly to the sympathies and charity of the churches and friends of our 
work among the Freedmen. 

The English course in the Theological Department occupies two 
years. It embraces the same studies as the full course, with the excep- 
tion of the Greek and Hebrew Scriptures. 



34 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



ECCLESIASTICAL, RELATIONS. 

By the charter of Lincoln University, the Theological Department 
is placed under the care of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church, in conformity with the general plan adopted for the supervi- 
sion of Theological Seminaries. The General Assembly, which met in 
Chicago in May, 1871, accepted the oversight of the Theological De- 
partments of Lincoln University, as provided in the charter, and 
approved the appointments and proceedings of the Board of Trustees, 
as reported at that time. The laws of Lincoln University require that 
any action of the Board of Trustees affecting the Theological Depart- 
ment shall be reported to the General Assembly by the Secretary of 
the Board. The Faculty of Theology is also required to prepare for 
the information of the General Assembly an annual report of their 
work in instruction, and of all matters of interest respecting the 
Theological Department. 

EXPENSES. 

FIRST SESSION. 

Coal, $ 5 00 

Furniture, 2 50 

Board and Washing, . 31 50— $39 00 

SECOND SESSION. 

Coal, . $ 8 00 

Furniture, 2 50 

Board and Washing, 31 50— 42 00 

Total for the year $81 00 

Theological and Missionary Society. 

The Theological and Missionary Society meets every Friday even- 
ing for exercises connected with Ministerial and Missionary work. 
The room occupied by the Society is supplied with a library of general 
and special commentaries, and furnished with religious and missionary 
periodicals. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 35 



SeBepal Statement. 



Lincoln University is in Chester County, Pennsylvania, half a 
mile from Lincoln University station, on the Philadelphia and Balti- 
more Central Railroad. That part of Chester County in which the 
University is situated is notably free from malarial and pulmonary 
diseases. The institution is well removed from associations which tend 
to prevent high literary attainments and hinder the formation of a high 
moral character. The post-office, where the Resident Professors should 

be addressed, is 

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY, 

Chester County, Pa. 

The corporate title of this institution is " Lincoln University." 
Bequests intended to promote the work of this University will be 
legally valid under that title. To the title add the place to prevent 
confusion with other Lincoln Institutions. 

The first charter of this Institution was granted by the State of 
Pennsylvania, under the title of " Ashmun Institute," in 1854. In 
1866 the title was changed by amendment of the charter to "Lincoln 
University." The Theological Department was, by another change 
of the charter in 1871, placed under the control of the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Church. 

The property of Lincoln University consists of land, buildings, 
endowments and apparatus. 

LAND. 

Seventy-eight acres in Lower Oxford, Pa. 

BUILDINGS. 

The Chapel. The Mary Dod Brown Memorial Chapel contains 
an audience room for Sabbath services capable of seating four hundred 
persons ; a Prayer Hall for daily use communicating with the chapel 



36 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



by sliding frames ; and two class-rooms similarly connected with the 
Prayer Hall. 

University Hall is designed exclusively for Recitation purposes. 
It is heated by steam throughout. Its ventilation has been carefully 
regarded. The Chemical and Physical Rooms are in the basement, 
and have concrete floors rising toward the rear to give a full view of 
experiments. They are furnished with water pipes and chimney ven- 
tilation. Provision has been made in them for the preservation of the 
valuable apparatus of the University, and for experimental instruction 
in these departments of Natural Science. 

The first story contains five rooms : a room for the Bible Recita- 
tions ; two rooms for the instruction of the Senior Class ; one for the 
Freshman Class ; and one for the Preparatory Department. 

The second story contains seven rooms : the President's office ; the 
Junior and Sophomore recitation rooms ; the Mathematical room ; and 
the Recitation rooms for the Theological Classes. 

The third story contains four rooms : the Museum and three Exam- 
ination rooms. The center of the roof is occupied with a revolving 
observatory for the reception of the telescope recently presented to the 
University by Charles P. B. Jefferys, Esq. 

This building is directly opposite the chapel, and with it presents 
an imposing appearance at the entrance to the campus. 

Livingston Hall is for commencement assemblies, and will seat 
one thousand persons. 

Ashmun Hall contains dormitories for students. 

Lincoln Hall contains dormitories for students ; and the Jani- 
tor's apartments. 

Cresson Hall contains dormitories for students ; and the library 
and reading room. 

Houston Hall contains dormitories and study rooms for the 
Theological students, and the room for the Theological and Missionary 
Society. 

There are nine residences for the Professors. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 37 



AIMS. 

Among the instrumentalities through which the friends of the 
Negro may convey to him the blessings of education, Lincoln Univer- 
sity especially deserves the confidence of the Christian public. She was 
the first to enter this field. Lincoln University was chartered to give 
a liberal Scientific, Classical and Theologicol education to colored youth 
of the male sex in 1854, six years before the war which resulted in 
emancipation. The liberal Christian education of their young men 
was the policy adopted by Lincoln University for the elevation of our 
colored population before the body of them became freedmen. 

We are still doing a large share of the higher work. Worthy 
applicants are knocking at our doors, eager for the benefits here 
afforded. Who will say to us, " Turn no worthy man away who desires 
an education for the sake of the good he can do with it? " 

It is certain that colored men will exert a large, and it may fairly 
be assumed, a controlling influence in forming and directing the cur- 
rents of opinion, and the gulf stream movements of industrial, social, 
educational and religious progress among these increasing millions of 
our population. It cannot be reasonably expected that their leaders 
should guide them along the lines of the common life of our whole 
people unless they are themselves educated, their principles established* 
and their opinions moulded in intelligent, conscious and consenting 
harmony with the public life of the nation. 

Their wise friends will not attempt to force their education into 
narrow- channels, while our education, as conducted in our colleges and 
seminaries of learning, is constantly expanded by an almost boundless 
generosity. To withhold the means of their liberal education, while 
we lavishly use them for the education of the more favored class, will 
arouse the suspicion that we design to keep them in an inferior position 
by fitting them for an inferior office. The trusted leader of colored 
troops would have to be drilled in all the tactics of modern warfare, 
and the leaders of this unorganized, agitated army of colored thinkers, 
who are now meditating how they will vote, and what they will under- 
take equally need to be drilled in all that makes thinking exact and 
safe. If their leaders are to co-operate with the leaders of this nation, 
they must be helped into agreement with them by a similar education. 

It is the purpose of the Trustees and Faculty of Lincoln University 
to communicate without stint and without delay all the advantages of 
a liberal Scientific, Classical and Christian education to such young 
men, according to our means and ability, in the conviction that this is 



38 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



fair to them ; that their needs are the same as ours ; and that as God 
has given them the ability to acquire all the parts of such education^ 
making no difference between them and us in natural endowments; so 
He will give them grace to use the power which accompanies education 
for the enlightenment and moral elevation of their own people and for 
the highest good of our whole people. 

RESULTS AND NEEDS. 

More than five hundred young men have been sent out from the 
Preparatory Department and from the lower classes of the Collegiate 
Department, many of whom are engaged in important positions as 
teachers in the Southern States. 

Four hundred and fifteen have been graduated from the Colle- 
giate Department, after a course of instruction extending through four 
and in many cases seven years. Most of these graduates are engaged 
in professional and educational labors in the Southern States. 

Two hundred and eight of the students of Lincoln University have re- 
ceived ordination as ministers in Evangelical Protestant denominations. 

Thirteen of our students have gone to Africa as missionaries of the 
cross. Four young men from Liberia are now in the University. 

The University is consecrated to the glory of God and the good of 
man. It has received the endorsement of all who are acquainted with 
its work. The friends of the education of " colored youth " are cor- 
dially invited to investigate its plans and operations, and co-operate 
with its officers in conferring the benefits of a liberal and Christian 
culture on those who prize and so much need this blessing. 

The whole work of Lincoln University needs immediate enlarge- 
ment. A comparatively small addition to her funds would greatly in- 
crease her power for usefulness. The attention of considerate friends 
is invited to the following special wants : 

The separate endowment and equipment of the Theological De- 
partment. This would require about fifty-five thousand dollars. 

The endowment of the Chair of Mental and Moral Science. 

The more adequate endowment of the existing Chairs of Instruction. 

The provision by endowment for the care and improvement of the 
property of the University. 

A domestic laundry. A system of safe lighting. An adequate 
water supply. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 39 



The completion of the one hundred Scholarships for the perpetual 
education of worthy young men, whose diligence, talents and piety give 
promise of usefulness. Twenty-two or one-fifth of them have already 
been endowed. 

On taking possession of our new commodious Hall of Instruction, 
the attention of the friends of the institution is called to the need of 
apparatus for the Scientific Department, particularly for the branches 
of Physics and Chemistry. 

THE LIBRARY. 

Immediate provision ought to be made for the preservation, 
enlargement and use of the Library by the erection of a suitable 
building. 



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